Trash Talk – Are your eyes bigger than your stomach?

Trash Talk – Are your eyes bigger than your stomach?

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Feb 25, 2013
Becky Tweedy, Assistant to the President

At MG account Guilford College, we weighed our daily food waste last semester to raise awareness about how much was being thrown in the trash.

Results?
300 pounds of food a day average almost half a pound of food per meal served!

How can you help?

  • Start with smaller portions, & come back for more!
  • Start a ‘clean plate club’, take what you’ll eat, eat what you take, spread the word!

Weekly Wisdom – Food Rules… Avoid foods advertised on TV

by smeyer

Feb 25, 2013
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian,

  • Food marketers are ingenious about boasting about “implied” healthfulness of their products (meaningful or not)
  • Escape these ploys by refusing to buy heavily promoted foods­i.e. heavily processed
  • Bogus food claims & faulty food science have made supermarkets “treacherous” places to shop for real food (to be continued)

Source: Michael Pollen, Food Rules

 

Trash Talk – Are your eyes bigger than your stomach?

by

Feb 25, 2013
Becky Tweedy, Assistant to the President

At MG account Guilford College, we weighed our daily food waste last semester to raise awareness about how much was being thrown in the trash.

Results?
300 pounds of food a day average almost half a pound of food per meal served!

How can you help?

  • Start with smaller portions, & come back for more!
  • Start a ‘clean plate club’, take what you'll eat, eat what you take, spread the word!

March Recipe: Brown Sugar & Mustard Bacon

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Serves 4

8 - pieces thickly sliced bacon (applewood smoked)
dijon mustard
1 1/2 -
dark brown sugar

  1. Preheat oven to 375°
  2. Lightly coat both sides with mustard, dredge in brown sugar, shake off excess
  3. Place on baking rack, on foil lined baking sheet
  4. Bake in upper third of oven until crisp, about 15 minutes
  5. Transfer to broiler, just long enough to caramelize sugar
  6. Serve warm

Chocolate Soufflé

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Feb 19, 2013
Denise Simmons, Corporate Chef

I had a friend over for dinner this past Saturday.  We talked about a bunch of different things we could make for dinner, but it came down to Laura (the friend) would make a barley risotto dish she’d been wanting to try for a while, and I would do something to accompany the risotto, with her help (she asked if she could spend time in the kitchen with me so she could ‘learn from the expert’).  When I asked her what she’d like to make, her immediate & rather animated response was ‘a SOUFFLE!!!’  

Yikes!  I was thinking roasted vegetables, or maybe a salad…even some type of simple dessert.  Definitely NOT thinking soufflé!  I’ve made them, but it’s been about 26 years-since I was in the Escoffier Room kitchen at CIA-just one class before graduation.  The E Room kitchen chef instructor was a stereotypical old-school European chef. I won’t go into gory details, but suffice it to say I was scarred for life by his screaming at me that if I put too much salt in the chocolate soufflé, he would make sure I never set foot in his kitchen again (I think he MAY have been joking…but it was hard to tell with him screaming at me & his face turning from red to purple).  Since I did graduate (and have the diploma to prove it), the seasoning of the chocolate soufflé was good, and I was able (tho not necessarily willing) to set foot in his kitchen the next day…and the next…and the next…

I think most people think of chefs as ‘experts’ who never fail, or who never have a dish that isn’t perfect…or edible.    I’m here to tell you that we probably mess up just as much as the next person (well, may not quite as much-we do have a good bit more practice-hopefully!)  The difference between a chef, or professional cook, and an inexperienced cook is that we know how to fix our mistakes. We can taste a dish & determine what it needs to make it truly excellent.  Except for baking…baking you have one shot, and if you mess it up, either you throw it out & start over, or mix the mess together & call it something totally different (maybe for my next blog post I’ll tell you the story of my first black forest cake…which was actually served as ‘Krumel Krugen’. Not sure my spelling is correct-it’s the name, given by our German exchange student, to the mess  after it slid off the plate, onto the counter, and a spatula was used to scrape it into a bowl.  Topped with copious amounts of whipped cream to cover the fact that it looked like it had been hit by a train, it ended up being rather tasty!).

But I digress…this is the story of the chocolate soufflé from this past weekend.  I looked online for a recipe suitable for 2 people.  It seemed rather easy…much more so than I remembered it being.  I even had all the ingredients already, except for 3 ounces of great quality bittersweet chocolate.  We gathered our mise en place, read our recipe & dove in.  The mixture looked pretty good as it was being gently spooned into the pre-buttered & sugared ramekins.  We set the time for 18 minutes & went back to the living room to play cards, so we wouldn’t be tempted to open the oven door & peek before the timer went off.  When the timer did go off, we opened the oven door to the sight of two beautiful chocolate soufflés.  They were incredible!  Light, airy, super chocolatey & delicious!  It appeared that my soufflé demon had been exorcised!  Thanks for pushing me to make them, Laura!
 

 

Weekly Wisdom – Food Rules… Avoid foods that are pretending to be something they are not

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Feb 19, 2013
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian,

  • Classic example: imitation butter, aka “margarine”
  • These products contain an extreme degree of processing; they are imitations
  • Avoid: mock meats, artificial sweeteners & fake fats & starches

Source: Michael Pollen, Food Rules

Tune up, turn down

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Feb 12, 2013
Becky Tweedy, Assistant to the President

  • Tune up your furnace and you could save 335 pounds of carbon emissions per year. (for gas furnace, you could save 252 pounds per year.)
  • Turn down your thermostat at night or when no one is home. For each degree, you save about 1% on heating costs & carbon emissions.

Think about it! Will you take a small step to help?
Source: The Green Book

Weekly Wisdom – Clues to heart health: Things you should be aware of now. Part 2

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Feb 11, 2013
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian,

  • Your hidden family history: Early family history of heart disease can be a clue to your risk.
  • The amount of sleep you get: Your risk of heart disease goes up with less than 6 hour sleep a night. Aim for 7- 8 hours.
  • Your heart health is in your hands, start by making positive changes!

Go red for American Heart Month

Heart aware month-go red

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Feb 5, 2013
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian,

The month of February is dedicated to raising awareness about heart disease and increasing knowledge about prevention.  Why is this important?  For starters, heart disease is the number 1 killer of women.  This disease causes 1 in 3 deaths each year and kills more than all kinds of cancer combined.  Pretty scary stuff when you see the statistics.  The good news is that we have a weapon to fight this disease by living a healthy lifestyle.  With good nutrition, exercise & regular check-ups with your physician, you can reduce your risk for heart disease.

Some tips for heart disease prevention:

Exercise for a minimum of 30 minutes per day with a goal of 60 minutes daily for weight maintenance.

Consume a diet rich in:
Fruits and vegetables: At least 4.5 cups a day
Fish (preferably oily fish, like salmon): At least two 3.5-ounce servings a week
Fiber-rich whole grains: At least three 1-ounce servings a day
Nuts, legumes and seeds: At least 4 servings a week, opting for unsalted varieties whenever possible
(Based on a 2000 calorie diet)

Other nutrition goals should include
Sodium: Less than 1,500 mg a day
Sugar-sweetened beverages: Aim to consume no more than 450 calories a week
Processed meats (bacon, sausage, hotdogs, etc): No more than two servings a week
Saturated fat (butter, lard, red meat, etc): Should comprise no more than 7 percent of your total calorie intake

Adapted from heart.org
For more information on heart disease and ways to reduce your risk visit www.heart.org

 

 

Weekly Wisdom – Clues to heart health: Things you should be aware of now. Part 1

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Feb 5, 2013
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian,

  • Think your drink: One serving of alcohol for women & 2 for men. One serving is just 4­6 oz.
  • Where you carry your weight: Even with a normal BMI (body mass index) abdominal obesity is risky.
  • Your hidden family history: Early family history of heart disease can be a clue to your risk.

Go red for American Heart Month