Trash Talk - Water saving tips

Trash Talk – Water saving tips

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October 30, 2012
Becky Tweedy, Assistant to the President

Water Saving Tips

Take a shorter shower – for every 2 minutes you trim off your shower time, you can conserve more than 10 gallons of water.
Turn off the tap while you brush your teeth – you’ll save up to 5 gallons per day. Throughout the US that could add up to 1.5 billion gallons per day – more than is consumed in NYC each day!
Dishwasher math – run full loads, and don’t pre-rinse dishes. Do both and you could save up to 20 gallons of water per load, as much as 7,300 gallons over a year. That is as  much as the average person drinks in a LIFETIME!

Think about it!
Will you take a small step to help?

Source: The Green Book

Weekly Wisdom – Food Rules…. Avoid food products that contain high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS)

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October 23, 2012
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian,

Food Rules…. Avoid food products that contain high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS)

  • Packaged foods containing HFCS are reliable markers for highly processed foods
  • HFCS is added to foods not traditionally sweetened; avoiding them will cut sugar intake
  • Sugar is sugar.  “NO HFCS” & “Real Cane Sugar” claims wrongly imply these products are healthier.

Source: Michael Pollen Food Rules

 

The sweet side of bitter greens

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October 17, 2012
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian,

This past week hasn't provided much inspiration for meals given my oldest son Oliver has been laid up with the GI bug.  In between cleaning up messes I haven't exactly been inspired to prepare gourmet meals in the kitchen.  However, I still need to eat, and despite some unpleasant scents (before cleaning with a vengeance) my hunger has not dissipated.  In a lucky turn of events, I received an abundance of greens from our CSA, and at the same time I stumbled upon this 'no cook' method for bitter greens. This is a delicious, quick way to prepare kale, spinach and any other green that comes your way.  The beauty is that I can prepare the greens in 2 minutes flat and sit down and enjoy a nutritious meal.  Yesterday I made the greens, boiled some whole wheat pasta and voila, my dinner.  Of course, now that Oliver is back to feeling well I expect "bitter" greens will not be on the nightly menu (well maybe just for me).

Source: eatingwell

November recipe: Curried Pumpkin Mousse

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Curried Pumpkin Mousse
Makes 3 cups

1/4c - minced shallot
2T - unsalted butter
2 1/2t -
curry powder
2t - chopped fresh thyme
2c - canned solid-pack pumpkin
8oz - local goat cheese, softened
3 -
heads belgian endive
1/2c - walnuts or pepetitas, lightly toasted & finely chopped

  1. Cook shallot in butter over low heat, stir, until soft
  2. Add curry, S&P
  3. Continue cooking & stirring for 1 minute
  4. Puree pumpkin & goat cheese
  5. Add shallot mixture & chopped thyme
  6. Chill, pipe onto ends of endive leaves, sprinkle with nuts

You may also serve as a dip with other vegetables, sliced local

 

Curried Pumpkin Mousse

by

Curried Pumpkin Mousse
Makes 3 cups

1/4c - minced shallot
2T - unsalted butter
2 1/2t -
curry powder
2t - chopped fresh thyme
2c - canned solid-pack pumpkin
8oz - local goat cheese, softened
3 -
heads belgian endive
1/2c - walnuts or pepetitas, lightly toasted & finely chopped

  1. Cook shallot in butter over low heat, stir, until soft
  2. Add curry, S&P
  3. Continue cooking & stirring for 1 minute
  4. Puree pumpkin & goat cheese
  5. Add shallot mixture & chopped thyme
  6. Chill, pipe onto ends of endive leaves, sprinkle with nuts

You may also serve as a dip with other vegetables, sliced local

 

Trash Talk – Still making the case for recycling

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October 16, 2012
Becky Tweedy, Assistant to the President

Still making the case for recycling

1,500 - Gallons of water it takes to make just one single drive-through order: hamburger, fries, & soda; including the water needed to grow potatoes, the grain for the bun & the cattle, and everything for the soda.
5,500,000 - Number of boxes of software thrown away each month
100,000 - Number of CDs thrown away each month
$370 mil - How much could be saved in landfill dumping fees if all Americans recycled their junk mail instead of trashing it!
Think about it!  Will you take a small step to help?

Source: The Green Book 

Weekly Wisdom – 5 Foods to beat cancer… Part 2

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October 16, 2012
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian,

5 Foods to beat cancer…Part 2
Parsley: This herb may inhibit cancer-cell growth. Add a couple pinches to dishes daily.
Coffee: Drinking about two 12 ounce coffees per day may lower your risk of breast cancer.  Antioxidants in coffee may offer protection against damaged cells that can lead to cancer.

Source: EatingWell 

 

Weekly Wisdom – 5 Foods to beat cancer… Part 1

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October 9, 2012
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian,

5 Foods to beat cancer... Part 1

Salmon: Omega 3 fish oils can reduce inflammation (which may contribute to cancer). Skip the supplement oil and choose about 8 oz of
oily fish per week.
Olive Oil: EVOO antioxidant content may quell growth of cancer cells
Broccoli: Sulforaphane - a compound in this green veggie may reduce growth of breast cancer (avoid overcooking, i.e. boiling)

 

Pumpkin hermits recipe

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October 3, 2012
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian,

Ahh, fall is upon us & I couldn’t be happier to welcome my favorite season.  While I enjoyed all of the fresh summer produce, my taste buds are now ready for crisp apples, fresh sautéed greens, sweet butternut squash and of course pumpkin.  This weekend, we visited a pumpkin farm and while technically the pumpkins were for decoration rather than eating,  it put me in the mood to prepare something pumpkin.  My son Oliver suggested “pumpkin cookies” and though we didn’t use our pumpkin purchases (they were just too pretty to cut open) we still got a taste of fall in every bite.

Pumpkin Hermits
Pumpkins are loaded with Vitamin A & fiber & low in calories.

  • 2 cups half all-purpose, half whole wheat
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • ½ tsp. baking soda
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • ¼ cup butter, softened
  • 1 cup packed brown sugar
  • ¾ cup canned pure pumpkin (preferably organic pumpkin or use fresh if you dare)
  • 1 large egg
  • ¼ cup dark molasses
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • ½ cup chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 350°F.

In a medium bowl, stir together the flour, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda and salt; set aside. In a large bowl, beat butter, brown sugar, pumpkin, egg, molasses and vanilla until smooth. Add flour mixture and stir by hand until almost combined; add chocolate chips, stir just until blended.

Drop large, rounded spoonfuls of dough 2” apart on a cookie sheet that has been sprayed with nonstick spray. Bake for 12–14 minutes, until just set — springy to the touch around the edges, but you still leave a slight dent if you touch them in the middle. Transfer to a wire rack to cool.

Makes 2 dozen cookies.

Source: Adapted from One Smart Cookie by Julie Van Rosendaal

 

A note from Joel

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October 2, 2012
Denise Simmons, Corporate Chef

Joel Salatin, owner/founder of Polyface Farm, marked a special anniversary lately.  Read below to understand how special this anniversary is to him, and to the scores of people who keep Polyface Farm going year after year.  An amazing milestone-for Joel, for Polyface & for sustainable farming!


A note from Joel...


Sept. 24, 1982 marked my first day of full time farming. It was a Monday, just like today, and the Friday previous I had cleaned out my desk in the Staunton News Leader newsroom and waved goodbye to my fellow journalists. Everyone thought I was making a huge mistake. Farming? Anything but that.

Even farmers thought I was making a huge mistake. And then to know that I was not going to use chemicals. That I was going to pasture chickens and pigs. That I wasn't going to build silos and plow the soil. How could anything be as ridiculous?


This morning I awakened to a farm festooned with balloons. I had mentioned the day and its 30-year importance in passing a couple of times during the summer, but frankly have been too covered up with responsibilities to plan any big celebration for myself. No worries. I'm surrounded by the most loyal, grateful, creative, dependable, conscientious team of young people you can imagine.


I've been crying all morning.


I think Eric and Brie led the plans. Overnight, they and accomplices decorated the farm with balloons, strategically placed to intercept my morning routine at every step. From the clothesline beside the backdoor to the equipment shed, balloons lined the path. The Massey Ferguson tractor they knew I would use to move the Eggmobile had balloons anchored to the wheels. As I approached the Eggmobile to hook it up, balloons cascaded off the front.


As is my routine, I went out to get the morning newspaper--once a news junkie, always a news junkie--and the farm entrance literally floated with balloons and our entrance sign had an explanatory addition in huge letters: Happy Anniversary Joel Full-time Farming 30 Years.


Tears welled up uncontrollably as the reality of the love and support of these young people overwhelmed me. To be this age, farming, surrounded by this kind of enthusiasm and honor--could it get any better than this? And then I had to chuckle: take that, friends, farmers, experts. All you folks that said I was throwing my life away, being foolish. Can you see me now? Ha!


I always check the cows in the morning. Yes, balloons on the 4-wheeler (my personal Japanese cow-pony). Streaming behind me, the balloons followed me up the three-quarter mile farm lane to the farm pasture. And as if that weren't enough, all along that route, from the trees and bushes, balloons heralded the celebratory day. We're here! We've made it this far! Touchdown! Hallelujah! Say it however you want to; scream it from the rooftops. We're still here. And not only have a survived, we've thrived.


Tears streaming down my face, I topped the little knoll before coming to the cows and there, adorning every electric fence stake in the cross fence, were more balloons. The cows, mostly lying down on this 38 degree morning (we actually had the first patchy frost of the season), simply burped up another wad of grass cud to chew on. They looked at me completely ordinarily. Nothing much upsets their routine. Nothing is as placid as a placid cow.


With gratitude and a deep sense of blessing welling in my heart, tears streaming down my cold cheeks, I headed back to the house for breakfast, the newspaper, morning emails, and desk work. My spirit is overflowing today.

Teresa and I had a dream. We worked at it. We prayed over it. We babysat it. We lived and loved it. Today it shines like a burning bush, attracting people from all over the world to come and see. Thank you, Lord, for 30 wonderful years.

And lest you're wondering, we don't think we've hardly started yet. Now we're not just a couple of people standing on the shoulders of our parents, but we're a tribe, with the next generation and the next and a whole team of players plugging the gaps where we're weak and leveraging our expertise where we're strong. Look out, world. Here we come.


Thank you, family. Thank you, Polyface team, staff, interns. Thank you, patrons who have stood by us monetarily, supporting us with your smiles, your eating, and yes, your dollars. Polyface Farm is charitable, but not a charity. It is a business, but not only a business. So raise your glasses, folks. Here's to another 30 years. Thank you.