Weekly Wisdom - Keep it real…choose fiber from whole foods

Weekly Wisdom – Keep it real…choose fiber from whole foods

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September 24, 2012
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian,

Keep it real…choose fiber from whole foods

  • Avoid “unnatural” sources of fiber, i.e. “fake” high fiber foods made with things like inulin & soluble corn fiber
  • Replace “fiber” cereal bars, etc. with fruits, vegetables, whole grains & legumes (beans)
  • Natural sources of fiber help you eat less, which in turn aids in weight loss 

Trash Talk – Making the case for recycling

September 24, 2012
Becky Tweedy, Assistant to the President

How long does it take to decompose?

 

 

Trash Talk – Making the case for recycling

September 24, 2012
Becky Tweedy, Assistant to the President

How long does it take to decompose?

 

 

Apples in the fall season

September 19, 2012
Denise Simmons, Corporate Chef

It seems every year about this time I feel compelled to write about how much I enjoy the fall.  It brings to mind comfort for me-warm sweaters, beautiful colors, piles of leaves, warm apples cider, and a little chill in the air, tinged with the scent of wood smoke.

One of my favorite foods of the season is apples. So versatile, so many varieties, eaten anytime of the day.  I’m partial to the crisp, tart varieties, old fashioned ones like the Macintosh and newer varieties like the (relatively) recently released Zestar. 

The Zestar is an apple that was created at the University of Minnesota in 1999. It’s an early season apple that is also cold hearty.  The flavor is amazing-just the right combination of sweet & tart.  Texture is just as I like it-nice & crisp, without being too hard, like a Granny Smith.

From the experts:
The Zestar! apple helps fill a gap. Most early season apples are mealy, which is why you should be making applesauce in August and waiting until later in September to start your pies.The Zestar! is a crunchy apple that is available early in the season. It also has a long shelf life, unlike it’s early season counterparts. You can store them in the fridge for up to a couple months. One negative of the Zestar! is that it tends to bruise rather easily, so one must be careful when harvesting and handling. A bruised apple will not have that long shelf live. I think this easy bruising is why I am not seeing this apple regularly sitting next to the Galas and Fujis at the local mega mart.
 

 

Apples in the fall season

September 19, 2012
Denise Simmons, Corporate Chef

It seems every year about this time I feel compelled to write about how much I enjoy the fall.  It brings to mind comfort for me-warm sweaters, beautiful colors, piles of leaves, warm apples cider, and a little chill in the air, tinged with the scent of wood smoke.

One of my favorite foods of the season is apples. So versatile, so many varieties, eaten anytime of the day.  I’m partial to the crisp, tart varieties, old fashioned ones like the Macintosh and newer varieties like the (relatively) recently released Zestar. 

The Zestar is an apple that was created at the University of Minnesota in 1999. It’s an early season apple that is also cold hearty.  The flavor is amazing-just the right combination of sweet & tart.  Texture is just as I like it-nice & crisp, without being too hard, like a Granny Smith.

From the experts:
The Zestar! apple helps fill a gap. Most early season apples are mealy, which is why you should be making applesauce in August and waiting until later in September to start your pies.The Zestar! is a crunchy apple that is available early in the season. It also has a long shelf life, unlike it’s early season counterparts. You can store them in the fridge for up to a couple months. One negative of the Zestar! is that it tends to bruise rather easily, so one must be careful when harvesting and handling. A bruised apple will not have that long shelf live. I think this easy bruising is why I am not seeing this apple regularly sitting next to the Galas and Fujis at the local mega mart.
 

 

Fresh off the boat dinner

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September 17, 2012
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian,

As I type this blog post I am gazing out into the ocean blue.  My family is on vacation this week and the pace of everyday life immediately slows down when we hit the beach.  However, despite my desire to sit on the beach, read & play silly games with my children, I still want to enjoy a good meal.  So, last night Tom and I dragged ourselves off the beach chairs and made a trip to the local fish market.  There we found fresh off the boat tuna & grouper.  This along with fresh squash, zucchini & juicy ears of corn purchased at the farmers market made up the menu of our first beach dinner. Coming back to a grill the size of a Mac truck, Tom proceeded to grill our treasures.  We sat down to a simple, yet delicious fresh meal of BBQ fish, roasted squash, eggplant and grilled corn.  Washed down with a glass of chilled wine made it all the better.  Cheers!  Who knows what we find tonight. Fresh shrimp anyone?

Weekly Wisdom – Food Rules…. Don’t eat anything your great grandmother wouldn’t recognize as FOOD!

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September 17, 2012
Sherri Meyer, MG Registered Dietitian,

Food Rules…. Don’t eat anything your great grandmother wouldn’t recognize as  FOOD!

  • “Go-gurt”…grandmother wonders “is it food or toothpaste”
  • “Avoid complicated foods”:  processed foods are specifically designed to get us to buy & eat more
  • Choose food that is found in nature

Source: Michael Pollen Food Rules

October recipe: Sweet Potato Ham Biscuits

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Sweet Potato Ham Biscuits
Makes 18 biscuits

2c - cooked sweet potatoes
2 1/4c - biscuit mix
1/4lb - brown sugar
2-3T - water
3T - softened butter
1lb - shaved virginia ham or turkey
3T - or more fig jam or fig confit

  1. Preheat oven to 350°
  2. Mash potatoes with biscuit mix & sugar. Add water to form soft dough
  3. Roll dough to1/2-inch thick, (on lightly floured surface) Cut with 2" floured cutter
  4. Bake on paper lined sheet trays, at 350° until golden brown, about 18 minutes
  5. Cool, split, spread with softened butter-about 1/2t per biscuit
  6. Fill with about 1-1 1/2oz ham (or turkey) & 1/2t fig jam per biscuit
 

Trash Talk – Bottled water vs. tap water

September 10, 2012
Becky Tweedy, Assistant to the President

Bottled Water vs. Tap Water by the numbers

2,000 – On average, bottled water consumes around 2,000 times more energy than tap
water.
1 to 3 – 1 liter of bottled water requires 3 liters of water to produce…
10,000 – Bottled water costs 10,000 times more than tap water in the US, more by volume than gasoline or soda.
30,000,000 – bottles per day end up in landfills or the ocean. Only 5% of plastic water bottles are recycled in the US.
Tap water is tested more often and held to higher safety standards than bottled water in the US.

Think about it!  Turn on the tap!

Source: Mother Earth News magazine

Trash Talk – Bottled water vs. tap water

September 10, 2012
Becky Tweedy, Assistant to the President

Bottled Water vs. Tap Water by the numbers

2,000 – On average, bottled water consumes around 2,000 times more energy than tap
water.
1 to 3 – 1 liter of bottled water requires 3 liters of water to produce…
10,000 – Bottled water costs 10,000 times more than tap water in the US, more by volume than gasoline or soda.
30,000,000 – bottles per day end up in landfills or the ocean. Only 5% of plastic water bottles are recycled in the US.
Tap water is tested more often and held to higher safety standards than bottled water in the US.

Think about it!  Turn on the tap!

Source: Mother Earth News magazine